High School

High School Resources

On-line resources for high school students

High School Ace
http://HighSchoolAce.com
A free resource center for teens. It features academic subject guides, reference tools, news, puzzles, quizzes, college information, and daily SAT sample questions.

Learning Centers Offering High School Level Classes

HomeLink Education
Meets Tues/Thurs. in south area near Bayless and Hwy 55
Directors: Cathy Mullins 314-769-7965
email: ekcjmullins@gmail.com
Kerrie Tate 3141-791-0000
email: kertatehomelink@aol.com
www.homeschool-life.com/mo/share (click on Homelink classes)
HomeLink’s purpose is to assist families with homeschooling and to provide support, encouragement, accountability, and training that will enhance the parent’s role as parent-teacher. It is not really a school. Rather, the program links academics to the students at home. It operates as a “college model,” allowing students to come to a class for one period per week, then accomplishing their study for that class at home, then returning the following week to review their work and move to the next lesson in the class. The targeted group for actual classes in HomeLink are grades 6-12 (sometimes younger).
Courses offered: General Science, Physical Science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics (the last 4 having labs), Spanish, German, Japanese, General Math for grades 4-8, Pre-Algebra, Algebra, Algebra 2, Geometry, Trigonometry, English, Institute for Excellence in Writing (IEW), American Literature, Composition, World History, British Literature, Composition, World Geography, Hands On English, Ancient Civilizations, Nutrition and Wellness, Missouri State History, Music Appreciation, ACT Prep Personal Finance, Capsela Physics, Economics/Business & Advertising, Guitar, Developing Reading Skills, and Art.

Pillar Foundation
15820 Clayton Rd., Ellisville, MO 63011
Contact: Mike Cordner
636-386-7722
http://www.thepillar.org
Specializes in junior and senior high school and adult American Christian History, Constitutional Law, economics, science and precept bible studies. Classes differ each year.

St. Charles Christian Home Educators Learning Center
The SCCHE Learning Center strives to assist the homeschool family with supplemental, once-weekly classes in a Christ-centered environment for upper junior high through high school students. Classes meet on Tuesdays from 8:30-2:30 in St. Peters. – for SCCHE members only
Phebe Martin 636-939-3225
email: phebem.scche@gmail.com
website: www.scche-mo.com

Homeschool Reunion

National Homeschool Alumni Reunion
Poplar Bluff, MO
Info: www.homeschoolalumni.org/reunion
Organizer of nation-wide homeschool reunion events.

College Preparation and Entrance Information

General Information

College Prep Seminars by the Wellers
Contacts:  Vickie and Bob Weller
website:  www.collegeprephomeed.com
email:  collegeprep@earthlink.net
To better meet the needs of parents desiring to home educate their children through high school, a monthly support group meeting is being offered on the fourth Monday of each month at The Pillar Foundation (15820 Clayton Road, Ellisville, MO) from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Each month a different topic pertaining to college preparation and applying for college will be discussed.  The goal of these meetings is to provide the nuts and bolts home educators need to feel confident to continue home educating their students through high school.

HSLDA High School Information Services
Information offered on grading guidelines, transcripts,  curriculum, extra-curricular, college admissions and much  more.  http://www.hslda.org/highschool/

CollegeXpress
A FREE public service for all students pursuing a comprehensive search for higher education aid. CollegeXpress offers a unique combination of time-saving interactive tools to help students and parents find a college, learn about financial aid, compare student loans, and research thousands of scholarship opportunities.   www.CollegeXpress.com

Dual Enrollment
The purpose of dual enrollment is to provide advanced level high school students the opportunity to take college level course work on a college campus. Many students use this option to expand on academic subjects that are not available at the high school level or to advance their skills beyond the level of their high school curriculum. Students not only receive credit from the college, but these same credits may also be counted on their high school transcript for graduation.

St. Louis Dual Enrollment / High School Home Schoolers Yahoo Group
This new yahoo group is a meeting place for home school families to learn about high school options, especially dual enrollment at area colleges.  The group is open to all St. Louis area home schoolers, who are either home schooling through high school or are planning to do so.  Topics posted so far include preparing for SAT, ACT, PSAT, CLEP and CBE testing, transcripts, curriculum, choosing a college and much more.  Yahoo groups are free to use, and we help you learn as you go – for the “non-techies.” Group moderator is Jo Ann Peterson, jeffreyandhoannp@aolcom email for info on how to join.

Advanced Placement Tests

Advanced Placement (AP) courses are courses that are taken during high school, but that are taught at the college level for both high school and college credit. Based on their performance on rigorous AP Examinations, students can earn credit, advanced college class placement, or both, for college. There are 37 different AP courses across 11 subject areas that culminate in the taking of a standardized AP test for each course given nationwide in the late spring (usually May). If a student scores high enough on the AP test, he can receive college credit in that subject area, depending on the policy at the institution he is attending. Each college determines the minimum score necessary on each AP test to earn credit and usually posts this information on its website. Each college also has a maximum number of AP credit’s a student can matriculate with. Tests are also used in determining advance placement in college coursework. Home-educated students can participate through independent study and distance learning programs. See below:
Starting in the ’07/08 school year there will be an advance, approval process required of all courses using an AP designation on a transcript.  This does not affect the ability of homeschoolers to take the test, it just mandates pre-approval of the syllabus.   The following link is for home educators to use when requesting information about the approval process.  apcourseaudit@epiconline.org
General AP information:
http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/about.html
http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/teachers_corner/46361.html

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)
The College-Level Examination Program or CLEP provides students of any age with the opportunity to demonstrate college-level achievement through a program of exams in undergraduate college courses. CLEP consists of a series of examinations that test an individual’s college level knowledge gained through course work, independent study, cultural pursuits, travel, special interests, military service schools, and professional development. CLEP General and Subject examinations are accepted for credit by more than 2,900 colleges and universities. Each institution determines its acceptable score and the amount of credit granted for each examination. By taking the CLEP test, your high schooled can earn expensive college credits for the low cost of the test.
Websites with CLEP information:
http://clepprep.tripod.com/cleplessonplans/
http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/clep/about.html
Books
CLEP Official Study Guide, 17th Edition By Henry Holt

General Equivalence Degree – GED
The GED is used to verify that an individual has attained a high school level of academic skills and knowledge equivalent of someone receiving a high school diploma from a traditional high school. Very few colleges require the GED as part of their application process, though there are a few. Many trade and technical schools, however, do have this requirement. A students post graduation plan will determine whether a GED will be necessary or useful.
Website offering information on the General Educational Development
http://www.acenet.edu/AM/Template.cfm?Section=GEDTS
Kaplan GED 2005-2006 Edition By Simon & Schuster Trade Sales

Transcript services and college counseling

Reichardt, Tricia
636-458-5054
online1904@charter.net
Transcript workshops and college counseling.

Transcript Pro
www.edplus.com
Transcript preparation software.

Transcript Boot Camp on DVD – featuring Inge Cannon.  They will also provide seminars for large groups and conventions. http://www.edplus.com/tbc.asp

Transcripts Made Easy – by Janice Campbell

The Homeschooler’s Guide to Portfolios and Transcripts – by Loretta Heuer / Peterson’s

Christian College Fair

Westminster Christian Academy
800 Maryville Centre Drive, Town & Country, MO 63017
314-997-2901 x139
ANNUAL CHRISTIAN COLLEGE FAIR – usually held in November. Over 60 Christian colleges represented at one of the largest Christian college fairs in the Midwest.
Admission information and requirements available for homeschoolers.

Examinations: SAT(PSAT) and ACT (PLAN)
As early as the 10th grade (or even earlier), students may take the SAT or ACT. Typically, students take the SAT or ACT during the 11th grade. Most colleges accept either the SAT or ACT tests, but some colleges have preferences. Check with an individual college to ascertain which test they prefer, if any. Both the SAT and ACT offer pre-tests that can be taken to provide both experience in these types of testing and can serve as a gage for future testing.

The PSAT includes the ACT and PLAN (PLAN is the pre-ACT test)
Websites with ACT and PLAN information:
American College Testing Program
http://www.act.org/

SAT and PSAT (PSAT)
Websites with SAT and PSAT/NMSQT information:

College Board Testing Program
www.collegeboard.com

Bob Johnson Tutoring
314-646-9548
www.BobJohnsonTutoring.com
email: Bob@BobJohnsonTutoring.com
Serving the Greater St. Louis Area, Bob Johnson Tutoring specializes in ACT prep, SAT prep, and math tutoring.  Bob received a Missouri teacher’s certificate for secondary mathematics and taught high school math for six years.  He also worked for two years as a private tutor and test prep course instructor, including one year with a nationally acclaimed test preparation company.  Bob and his wife, Jill, homeschool their two children.

The Princeton Review
6358 Delmar Blvd., Suite 400, St. Louis, MO 63130
314-862-7540
e-mail infostlouis@review.com or kathim@review.com

Kaplan Test Prep
at I-270 Delcrest Plaza
8448 Delmar, St. Louis, MO 63124
314-997-7791
www.kaptest.com

Website for ACT Test Prep
http://www.actstudent.org/testprep/index.html

Website for SAT Test Prep

http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/prep_one/prep_one.html

HSDLA Free Test Preparation Product
HSLDA has partnered with eKnowledge and NFL players to offer free SAT/ACT test preparation products to homeschool students. While the program is free, shipping and handling charges do apply.  Go to http://www.hslda.org/tour/satprep.asp for more information.

4Tests.com
http://www.4tests.com/exams/exams.asp
Provides free on-line practice tests for AP, CLEP, GED, SAT, ACT, PSAT, and many more.

SAT Math Review Video Package by Chalk Dust Company

Resources for SAT Preparation By For Such a Time as This Ministries

SAT Preparation Course on DVD by Lynn Scully

The Official SAT Study Guide, Fourth Edition Book by Henry Holt

Cracking the ACT with Sample Tests on CD-ROM, 2006 Edition

Test Prep at CBD.com By Princeton Review / Random House, Inc

Financial Assistance

The United States Department of Federal Student Aid (FSA) program is the primary source of student aid. It provides more than $60 billion a year in grants, loans, and work-study assistance.
Applying for student aid through FAFSA is free. There are some groups that offer financial aid procurement services for a fee. These groups should be thoroughly investigated.
Free Application for Federal Student Aid http://studentaid.ed.gov/students/publications/FYE/2005_2006/english/applying-federalstudentaid.htm

There are three types of federal student aid: grants, work-study, and loans.

Grants are financial aid that doesn’t have to be repaid (unless, for example, you withdraw from school and owe a refund). Examples are Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants and the Pell Grants.

Work-study allows you to earn money for your education.

Loans allow you to borrow money for school. You must repay your loans, with interest.

For additional information on financing college:

http://www.ed.gov/finaid/info/find/edpicks.jhtml?src=ln

http://www.collegeboard.com/student/pay/index.html

Books

College Without Compromise by Scott & Kris Wightman

The College Board Scholarship Handbook, 2006 By Holtzbrinck Publishers

Kaplan Scholarships 200X: More Than $1 Billion in Free Money for College By Simon & Schuster Trade Sales

The Scholarship Book, 11th Edition By Daniel Cassidy / Penguin Putnam Inc.

Winning Scholarships for College: An Insiders Guide, By Marianne Ragins / Holtzbrinck Publishers

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